Lemonade Farm

In 2010, I had trouble keeping up with this blog and wrote the post I’ve Been Cheating On You to explain that I’d been writing for a local paper and it was eating into my blogging time. It’s time for another confession. I’ve actually had plenty to blog about lately, from the Paul McCartney concert to attending the Pelicans first pre-season game – but I’ haven’t made the time to write about it because I’ve been “cheating” again. I’m putting the finishing touches on my first novel, Lemonade Farm. Continue reading

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Filed under Concerts, entertainment industry

Brothels, Bordellos and Ladies of the Night Walking Tour

Other than hitting Bourbon Street, I believe the city’s many walking tours and carriage rides must be the most popular tourist activity in New Orleans. Throughout the French Quarter and Garden District, people gather around stringently-licensed tour guides enlivening historical facts (and stories) about everything from architecture and colorful characters to above-ground cemeteries and Voodoo. At night, the Quarter is cluttered with criss-crossing groups of people wanting to learn more about the “most haunted city in America” from one of the city’s many spirit tours (Scary Mary is regarded as the most fact-based fun). But there are many stories locals tell each other that tourists seldom hear. The stories of the city’s brothels and the women who worked them are the subject covered by Two Chicks Walking Tours‘ unique Brothels, Bordellos and Ladies of the Night walking tour.  Continue reading

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Filed under Culture, decorations and costumes, history, walking

Return to L.A.

Though Louisiana has always felt like home to me, I never actually lived here until 2009. And though I spent nearly 18 years in Los Angeles, I never actually felt truly home there. That said, I’ve made sure I return at least once a year to see friends, take care of business and have a meal at Mel’s Drive-In on Sunset. This time, I was headed to L.A. to participate in the Courts Celebrity Fan Fest. It seemed funny somehow to return to L.A. to sign autographs. The city is as packed to the gills with celebrities as New Orleans is with Grammy winners so I hardly feel like I stand out in a crowd. But it all made sense when I spoke to the students at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts (AADA) at their Industry Insight Series. Continue reading

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Filed under entertainment industry, moving, the Saints

Judging the Queen of Burlesque Contest

As a “celebrity,” I’ve gotten to judge a bikini contest, 2 gumbo contests, a beauty pageant and the Greasing of the Poles, but judging the Queen of Burlesque contest was the best time I’ve had yet. The jewel in the 3-day, 6th annual New Orleans Burlesque Festival crown, the contest featured a lively M.C., singing, a jazz band and top burlesque dancers from  near and far. The show opened with a performance by last year’s winner, “Medianoche.” I’d seen a VIDEO of her winning performance and by the end I had laughed, cried and been overwhelmed by the wonder of woman. Continue reading

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Filed under Culture, decorations and costumes, entertainment industry, festival, history

Who Dat Game Day Poem

I’m no poet, but I felt inspired to express my feelings about the Saints and what it means to be a fan – in rhyme.

For Catholics, feel free to substitute the first 2 lines with, “I was born Catholic/(Though an angel, I ain’t)”

Who Dat Game Day Poem

I wasn’t born Catholic

An angel I ain’t,

But come Sunday morning

I pray for my Saints. Continue reading

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Filed under Culture, Super Bowl 2010, the Saints

Gumbo Judging!

For me, one of the benefits of working in film and TV is getting to judge contests. So far, I’ve judged a beauty pageant in Mississippi, the Royal Sonesta’s Greasing of the Poles and last year’s gumbo contest at Valero. As much as I enjoy beautiful women, I was thrilled to be asked back to Valero this year. Gumbo, the official dish of Louisiana, is my favorite metaphor for New Orleans – a melting pot where each ingredient added is meant to retain its original flavor. Even the history of the dish is a trip through the many cultures that have come to this city and the traditions they’ve added to our stew.  Continue reading

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Filed under Charity, Culture, history, Local Cuisine

Southern Decadence Parade (photos!!!)

Southern Decadence is a 5-day weekend of costumes, revelry and parades celebrating the LGBT community that brings over 150,000 people and a nearly $200 million economic impact. Decadence started at a party of friends and roommates throwing a going-away party for a friend in 1972 in their inauspicious Treme home nicknamed Belle Reve after the  Mississippi plantation Blanche DuBois’ refers to in A Streetcar Named Desire so the roommates (including gays, straights, blacks and whites) made the send-off a costume party with the theme of coming as your favorite “Southern Decadent.” They chose the Sunday before Labor Day to give themselves a day of recovery afterward then repeated the party the following year with an informal parade. Over 40 years later, the all-inclusive party is bigger and more decadent than ever. Continue reading

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Filed under Charity, Culture, decorations and costumes, free events and lagniappe, history, parade